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Top 10 Excuses for Not Exercising

By this time, you should already know that exercising is good for you, and that you should be doing it regularly. And yet, for some reason or another, you don't. To help get you out of your exercise rut, below are the top 10 excuses for not exercising, and how to deal with each.

Excuse #1: I don’t have time

How much time do you spend watching TV, reading a book or playing video games? If you’re not making an excuse and really have no time because of work (which is still highly unlikely), then exercise in the workplace. Close your office door and do jumping jacks or jog in place. You can also start taking the stairs from now on, or walk to a nearby meeting instead of driving there. The trick is to finding how it fits into your routine and making a habit out of it.

Excuse #2: I’m too old/fat/tired

Three things to remember:

  • You're never too frail or too old to exercise. If you're old, exercise can help you avoid muscle loss or sarcopenia. It also improves your balance and actually lowers the risk of falling.
  • Combined with proper diet, exercise can help you shed the pounds. You don't have to hit the gym and sweat buckets; it should be done gradually.
  • Exercising will actually give you more energy. It improves your circulation and causes your body to produce endorphins, which make you feel good.

Excuse #3: It’s hard to exercise

Yes, it can hard, especially at first. But you know, it doesn’t have to be punishing for it to be effective. All you have to do is start moving by walking, swimming or even doing housework. And you know what’s even harder than exercise? Getting sick for lack of it.

Excuse #4: I don’t like to move/sweat/exert effort

One misconception about exercise is that you need to move around, and get all tired and sweaty to do it. You can actually get a good workout by staying in place through yoga, and it’s not hard even for beginners.

Excuse #5: Exercise is downright boring

Exercise is too broad to be confined to activities like jogging or going to the gym, which may not appeal to some. If you find running or pumping iron boring, then find an activity that you enjoy. Do you have a green thumb? Try gardening. Love music? Try dancing. Would you rather be with friends? Try a group sport. Want to go solo? You can always ride a bike around the neighbourhood.

Excuse #6: I have arthritis

Exercise eases joint pain, strengthens the muscles around your joints, helps control your weight and give you more energy. Yes, moving around with arthritic joints can be daunting, but you don’t need to exert a great deal of effort since moderate exercising will do. In reality, not exercising can worsen your arthritis. Just make sure you consult your doctor first before exercising.

Excuse #7: I’m busy taking care of my kids

Then bring your kids with you. Exercising with them would actually let you have quality time with them. You can do something fun together like biking, walking the dog, or even playing an exercise game on the Wii.

Excuse #8: My back hurts

Sorry, back pain still isn’t an excuse because exercise is actually a great way to ease and avoid back pain. Some exercises that can reduce your back pain include the following:

  • Aerobics and cardio exercises
    Examples include jogging, mowing the lawn, raking leaves and taking the stairs.

  • Stretching exercises
    Stretching will help you prevent injury by making your muscles flexible.

  • Strengthening exercises
    For best results, focus on stretching your calves and doing stomach crunches.

Excuse #9: I’m already thin

While being slim is a good start, it doesn’t necessarily mean you’re healthy. Exercise can boost your strength and endurance, give you more energy, bolsters your immune system, and keep you staying slim.

Excuse #10: I’ll quit anyway

If you think you’ll quit anyway, then you need to get motivated to get fit. What you need to do is start by setting small and realistic goals, then work your way from there. For instance, you can do five minutes per day on your first week, then 10 minutes the following week, and so on. What’s important is that you start and keep going. To keep you honest, keep an exercise log or invite an exercise partner.